Informal settlements along railroad tracks in Dunoon, Cape Town, South Africa. 

Inequality in South Africa isn't just between white and black; there are apartheid-era divisions between white, black, colored, and Indian communities that are still in place. 

An abandoned gold mine in Johannesburg sits behind the community of Makause. Many communities suffer from toxic pollution and water contamination from these mines and mine dumps. 

A lone worker stands atop a fence built to separate a new housing estate from an informal settlement, in Johannesburg, South Africa. 

A train line separates formal and informal communities in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. 

Dunoon, Cape Town, South Africa. 

Philippi, Cape Town, South Africa.

Inequality in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa.

Msawawa and Cedar Creek Estates, Johannesburg, South Africa. 

Near Ottery, Cape Town, South Africa.

Commuting by train is a necessity for most Cape Town workers. The city geography and history of forced separation of the races during apartheid means that most black and colored people live in the outskirts of the city, and commute in to the city center, which is only accessible from one direction (due to the ocean and mountain). Beset by failures, theft, and crime, it is a struggling state owned enterprise. 

Dunoon, Cape Town, South Africa.

Inequality in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa.

Inequality between the black and colored neighborhoods of Manenberg and Phola Park, Cape Town, South Africa. 

Jakkalsfontein Golf Estate / Zandspruit Informal Settlement, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Inequality in Johannesburg, South Africa (2016). The 2018 version of this image was featured on the cover of Time Magazine. 

Cape Town, South Africa.

Dunoon, Cape Town, South Africa.

Informal settlements line the edges of the formal section in Khayelitsha, Cape Town, South Africa. 

Monwabisi informal settlement, Khayelitsha, Cape Town, South Africa. 

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